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The symptoms associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can often be debilitating, significantly affecting a patient’s quality of life. Air Force mental health professionals have successfully treated many Airmen with the use of prolonged exposure therapy. Through this collaborative therapy, the patient is safely and gradually exposed to trauma-related memories and situations that have been avoided. The eventual goal is to alter the patient’s relationship with and reaction to the traumatic event so it no longer affects their quality of life and ability to do their job. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Josh Mahler) A peek behind the curtain: Prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD
Post-traumatic stress disorder can be debilitating, but there are therapies that can reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and help Airmen return to duty. One of the most effective therapies, practiced by many Air Force mental health professionals, is prolonged exposure therapy.
0 7/03
2018
Many Airman are unaware what the initial meeting with a mental health provider looks like when they seek PTSD treatment. The goal of the first meeting is to make the patient feel comfortable and to be as transparent as possible about what is going on and what treatment options the patient has. As a result, the patient and mental health provider will more likely have a collaborative and trusting interaction, making PTSD treatment more successful. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Josh Mahler) A peek behind the curtain: The first step of PTSD care
Perhaps the most difficult part of seeking help for post-traumatic stress disorder is making that first appointment, since Airmen are often unsure of what to expect. Not knowing what to expect from mental health providers can get in the way of effective PTSD treatment.
0 6/26
2018
Those that suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are consistently trying to regain some sense of the normalcy they had before events that caused pieces of themselves to go missing. Misconceptions and stigmas surrounding PTSD get in the way of successful recovery and the ability to return to duty. (U.S. Air Force illustration by Master Sgt. William Vance) A peek behind the curtain: PTSD barriers and stigmas
Effective treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder is possible, but many Airmen falsely think seeking medical help for PTSD will hurt their career and will not help them get better. These stigmas and misconceptions create perceived barriers, preventing Airmen from seeking care. Delaying treatment can cause the anxiety and fear following a traumatic event to affect an Airman’s readiness.
0 6/20
2018
Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson testifies before the U.S. House of Representatives Armed Services Committee about the Air Force’s fiscal year 2019 budget March 20, 2018, in Washington, D.C. (U.S. Air Force photo by Wayne Clark) SECAF: Accelerating defendable space, multi-domain operations key to future readiness
Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson testified before the U.S. House of Representatives Armed Services Committee about the Air Force’s fiscal year 2019 budget March 20, 2018, in Washington, D.C.
0 3/21
2018
Default Air Force Logo Air Force Fiscal Year 2019 budget addresses great power competition
The Air Force budget request of $156.3 billion for fiscal year 2019 builds on the progress made in 2018 to restore the readiness of the force, increase lethality, and cost-effectively modernize.
0 2/13
2018
Mental health readiness Good mental health critical to readiness
Mental health is a critical part of every Airman’s medical readiness. Although many service members worry that seeking mental health care will negatively effect their career, the opposite is usually true. With early identification and the right treatment by a medical professional, most mental health issues get better quickly without any negative career impact.
0 11/20
2017
Air Force leaders recently released new Air Force priorities. Air Force senior leaders unveil new priorities
In a recent letter to the Total Force, Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein and Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force Kaleth O. Wright released their new priorities and addressed issues Airmen face day to day.
0 8/02
2017
Newly sworn Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson thanks family, friends and colleagues during her ceremonial oath of office as the 24th Air Force secretary, at the Pentagon event, May 16, 2017.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Wayne A. Clark) Mattis welcomes new SecAF home
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis ceremoniously swore in Heather Wilson as the 24th Secretary of the Air Force at the Pentagon May 16, 2017.
0 5/16
2017
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