Hanscom Air Force Base   Right Corner Banner
Join the Air Force

News > To Drive or Not to Drive
To Drive or Not to Drive

Posted 5/20/2010   Updated 5/20/2010 Email story   Print story

    


by 1st Lt. Konrad Osa and Staff Sgt. Samantha Harvey
Electronic Systems Center Legal Office


5/20/2010 - HANSCOM AIR FORCE BASE, Mass.  -- To drive or not to drive? Don't let that be the question. As the summer months approach, with barbeques and pool parties, the Hanscom legal office wants to remind everyone how important it is to consume alcohol safely.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 32 people in the United States die every day due to vehicle crashes involving alcohol. This amounts to one death every 45 minutes. Before consuming alcohol, every Airman should plan how he or she is going to return home. Airmen who choose to drink and drive run the risk of causing serious injury or death to themselves and others.

Additionally, if an Airman manages to survive driving drunk, he or she can still face criminal, civil and administrative actions. Airmen are held accountable for their actions both on and off base. A single driving under the influence, or DUI, ticket can severally damage an airman's military career and future. DUIs have a negative effect on a member's unit and on the Air Force mission. A person can be charged with a DUI if they are over the state's legal blood alcohol limit. Even if a person is under the state limit and the court feels that the member was too impaired to operate a vehicle, a DUI ticket can still be issued. Airmen should not try to guess as to whether they are under or over the limit.

During fiscal year 2009, there were 6,024 counts of alcohol related misconduct within the Air Force, and 1,576 of these were DUIs. Members who are found driving under the influence may be charged with a violation of Uniform Code of Military Justice, Article 111. Should drunken driving result in personal injury, Airmen face a dishonorable discharge and confinement for 18 months, among other punishments. If no one is injured, Airmen still face a bad conduct discharge and six months confinement and other punishments. Furthermore, other UCMJ violations may also be implicated if, for example, the driver was underage or there was property damage.

The Hanscom legal office hopes all Airmen make the positive, mature decision to use a designated driver or other safe way to return home after consuming alcohol.



tabComments
No comments yet.  
Add a comment

 Inside Hanscom AFB

ima cornerSearch

tabMission NewsRSS feed 
BACN hits 100,000 hours of ensuring connectivity for warfighters

New contract vehicle opens doors for Battle Management programs

New Horizons slated for March 1 and 2

Hanscom AWACS team reaps reward

Recapitalizing JSTARS: the radar

tabHanscom NewsRSS feed 
Future NCOs prepare for leadership

Cold and flu season is here

Military Saves Week scheduled Feb. 23-28

Program offers social, recreational activities to single Airmen

Vet Clinic will host open house Feb. 25

Hanscom preparing employees for Acquisition Demonstration transition

ABG announces annual award winners

Hanscom firefighters deliver baby

Hanscom Fire Department named best in AFMC

OPM offers limited enrollment period for new self-plus-one option

tabNews Briefs and HappeningsRSS feed 
Upcoming events

News in Brief

School Notes  1

tabCommentaryRSS feed 
Aftermath of a DUI: Who's really affected?

Airman shares family tragedy as "wake up call"

Holiday greetings from the base commander

tabPhoto FeatureRSS feed 
Photo feature: This week at Hanscom, Feb. 12

Photo feature: This week at Hanscom, Feb. 5

tabFeaturesRSS feed 
Laying the foundation for future AF, Coast Guard enlisted leaders

Command chief focused on mission, careers of Airmen

From Army Air Corps to U.S. Air Force, 71-years and counting


Site Map      Contact Us     Questions     USA.gov     Security and Privacy notice     E-publishing  
Suicide Prevention    SAPR   IG   EEO   Accessibility/Section 508   No FEAR Act