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Security Forces to debut EZ Child ID system

Senior Airman Christopher Anderson, 66th Security Forces Squadron Pass and Registration controller, holds a sample EZ Child ID card at Hanscom Air Force Base, Mass., July 21. The EZ Child ID can be used to assist law enforcement in the case of a missing person, and can be issued to children, teens, adults, or senior citizens. (U.S. Air Force photo by Lauren Russell)

Senior Airman Christopher Anderson, 66th Security Forces Squadron Pass and Registration controller, holds a sample EZ Child ID card at Hanscom Air Force Base, Mass., July 21. The EZ Child ID can be used to assist law enforcement in the case of a missing person, and can be issued to children, teens, adults, or senior citizens. (U.S. Air Force photo by Lauren Russell)

Staff Sgt. Jonah Cornwell, 66 SFS noncommissioned officer in charge of Electronic Security Systems, left, and Senior Airman Christopher Anderson, 66 SFS Pass and Registration controller, demonstrate how they capture finger prints for an EZ Child ID card at Hanscom Air Force Base, Mass., July 21. The EZ Child ID profiles contain all details found in both AMBER and Silver Alerts including a photo, weight, height, identifiable markings, and all fingerprints. (U.S. Air Force photo by Lauren Russell)

Staff Sgt. Jonah Cornwell, 66 SFS noncommissioned officer in charge of Electronic Security Systems, left, and Senior Airman Christopher Anderson, 66 SFS Pass and Registration controller, demonstrate how they capture finger prints for an EZ Child ID card at Hanscom Air Force Base, Mass., July 21. The EZ Child ID profiles contain all details found in both AMBER and Silver Alerts including a photo, weight, height, identifiable markings, and all fingerprints. (U.S. Air Force photo by Lauren Russell)

Senior Airman Christopher Anderson, left, 66th Security Forces Squadron Pass and Registration controller, and Staff Sgt. Jonah Cornwell, 66 SFS noncommissioned officer in charge of Electronic Security Systems, demonstrate how they create an EZ Child ID card at Hanscom Air Force Base, Mass., July 21. The EZ Child ID profiles contain all details found in both AMBER and Silver Alerts. (U.S. Air Force photo by Lauren Russell)

Senior Airman Christopher Anderson, left, 66th Security Forces Squadron Pass and Registration controller, and Staff Sgt. Jonah Cornwell, 66 SFS noncommissioned officer in charge of Electronic Security Systems, demonstrate how they create an EZ Child ID card at Hanscom Air Force Base, Mass., July 21. The EZ Child ID profiles contain all details found in both AMBER and Silver Alerts. (U.S. Air Force photo by Lauren Russell)

HANSCOM AIR FORCE BASE, Mass. – The 66th Security Forces Squadron will soon offer EZ Child ID cards to the Hanscom community to assist families and law enforcement in the case of a missing person.

The software creates a comprehensive identification card that captures all the needed information that would assist law enforcement in locating a person, including a photo, height, weight, identifiable markings, and all fingerprints.

The system will debut at Hanscom’s National Night out Aug. 6.

“Having this information readily available in an emergency can save law enforcement valuable time in locating an individual,” said Senior Airman Christopher Anderson, 66 SFS Pass and Registration controller. 

Despite the name, the program can be used for children, teens, adults or senior citizens. The profile includes all of the details found in both AMBER and Silver Alerts, and can be used anywhere.

“This system is very well known, and can be used on or off base,” said Staff Sgt. Jonah Cornwell, 66 SFS noncommissioned officer in charge of electronic security systems. 

Andersen said a profile takes only minutes to create and that no information is stored or kept on file for privacy reasons.

“We will give the family an ID card and disc with the information on it, so families can print it out to share with other family members, caregivers or babysitters,” he said.

Officials plan to continue offering the service on an appointment basis at the 66 SFS building, and recommend families renew ID cards following any major changes to the individual’s appearance.

Anderson and Cornwell pitched the EZ Child ID system to base leaders at the Warhawk Innovation Council earlier this year.

“Hanscom is a very family-oriented installation, and we want to bring an added sense of comfort to our community,” said Cornwell.