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Qatar moves one step closer to receiving U.S. Air and Missile Defense Operations Center

A set of three Army Patriot missile launchers assigned to Charlie Battery, 3rd Battalion, 4th Air Defense Artillery Regiment stand ready to defend the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing against airborne threats to at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia on April 24, 2014. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Master Sgt. Eric Peterson/Released)

A set of three Army Patriot missile launchers stand ready to defend the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing against airborne threats at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia. The Patriot Air and Missile Defense System is just one component planned for the future Qatar Air and Missile Defense Operations Center. The Qatar ADOC program office at Hanscom AFB, Mass., recently awarded a $160 million contract to Raytheon for the procurement, delivery, installation and sustainment of an ADOC system for the Qatari Emeri Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Master Sgt. Eric Peterson)

HANSCOM AIR FORCE BASE, Mass. -- Last week the Air Force and the State of Qatar finalized an agreement for the next step in the delivery of a U.S. integrated air and missile defense system for the Qatari Emeri Air Force.

The Qatar Air and Missile Defense Operations Center (ADOC) program located at Hanscom AFB awarded Raytheon a $160 million contract for Phase II of the initiative. The contract covers the procurement, delivery, installation and sustainment of the Qatar ADOC system as well as training of Qatari personnel.

Qatar -- a key U.S. partner and also a member of the Gulf Cooperation Council (a political and economic alliance of six Middle Eastern countries) - requested the purchase of a U.S. missile defense system, said James Ware, Qatar ADOC program manager. 

"By supporting this sale, it will ultimately benefit the U.S. by providing better interoperability with U.S. Central Command forces," he added.

U.S., coalition forces and the Gulf Cooperation Council share information for united defense and work hand-in-hand within USCENTCOM.

The ADOC itself is a command and control center focused on air and missile defenses. It  consists of multiple different weapon systems and radars, and is composed of a command center, space for operations and planning personnel as well as senior leader offices.

With the next phase underway and on track, the Hanscom program office plans to meet with Qatari officials this month to discuss interoperability requirements to determine what information will be exchanged between the ADOC and existing and planned systems. 

One of the systems that is planned to be integrated into the ADOC is the Army's PATRIOT Air and Missile Defense System.

"Mutual approval is necessary prior to adoption of any planned integrated system to ensure data protection is commensurate with prescribed U.S. procedures and standards," Ware said. 

Program officials also plan to conduct an Interim Design Review that will allow Raytheon to receive stakeholder feedback early in the development cycle.

"Ultimately, the delivery of the ADOC not only improves upon Qatar's defense infrastructure, but helps solidify an ongoing partnership between the two countries,"  said Tom Cook, Qatar ADOC branch chief.