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  • A peek behind the curtain: The first step of PTSD care

    Perhaps the most difficult part of seeking help for post-traumatic stress disorder is making that first appointment, since Airmen are often unsure of what to expect. Not knowing what to expect from mental health providers can get in the way of effective PTSD treatment.

  • A peek behind the curtain: PTSD barriers and stigmas

    Effective treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder is possible, but many Airmen falsely think seeking medical help for PTSD will hurt their career and will not help them get better. These stigmas and misconceptions create perceived barriers, preventing Airmen from seeking care. Delaying treatment

  • Good mental health critical to readiness

    Mental health is a critical part of every Airman’s medical readiness. Although many service members worry that seeking mental health care will negatively effect their career, the opposite is usually true. With early identification and the right treatment by a medical professional, most mental health

  • New annual Mental Health Assessment requirement begins July 31

    Starting July 31, 2017, Airmen undergoing their annual Periodic Health Assessment may notice something new. A Mental Health Assessment will now be part of every annual PHA, to help ensure that Airmen suffering from undiagnosed mental health issues are referred to the necessary care. Mental health

  • PTSD treatment confronts the trauma behind the disorder

    FALLS CHURCH, Va. -- Post-traumatic stress disorder is considered one of the “signature wounds” of the current conflicts in the Middle East. But many people may not know that there are highly effective treatments for this invisible wound being deployed at Air Force hospitals and clinics today. It’s

  • Don’t suffer alone – mental health disorders have effective treatments

    Mental health disorders are relatively common within civilian and military communities, but with early treatment, most mental health disorders can be effectively treated, and patients can return to mental wellness. While invisible wounds like post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury